We, the Pacific Island Chiefs of Police, are sending a clear message to stop the violence in our communities, especially violence against women.

The Gender and Family Harm (GFH) Programme is a mandated programme of the PICP and represents one of the highest collective priorities of the Pacific Chiefs.

Domestic violence, intimate partner violence, family violence, family harm and sexual and gender-based violence are all terms used to describe crimes that disproportionately affect women and girls in communities all over the world.

Physical violence, mental or psychological coercion, sexual violence and other controlling behaviours are crimes that undermine the safety, security and basic human rights of their victims and prevent our Pacific communities from reaching their full potential. While there are many terms for this issue – and almost every jurisdiction has its own definition, supported by its own laws – a key theme underpins them all: violence against women. It is true that police cannot address this issue alone, but we, as police officers across the Pacific, must play a key role in responding to gender and family harm in our communities.

The PICP Gender and Family Harm Programme Strategic Direction 2021-24 articulates how Pacific police will address this issue through ‘Ownership’ and ‘Partnerships’.

PICP Gender and Family Harm Programme Strategic Direction 2021-24 (PDF, 1.8MB)

Contact
PICP Secretariat: picp.secretariat@police.govt.nz

Gender and Family Harm Strategic Direction

Message from Chief Tim Wilson
GFH Programme Lead

The Gender and Family Harm Strategic Direction clearly sets out our collective agreement to work together on a shared problem throughout our Pacific communities. The Pacific Chiefs and I are committed to working with our Pacific communities as leaders in this field.

We will do this through opening our hearts – by accepting that gender and family harm is a serious and ongoing problem and accepting our responsibility to address it.

It is true that police cannot address this issue alone, but we, as police officers and leaders across the Pacific, must play a key role in responding to gender and family harm in our communities.